Past Exhibitions

“LA GAZETTE du BON TON”

Gazette Du Bon Ton

 

 

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The magazine, La Gazette du Bon Ton, was founded in 1912 by Lucien Vogel (1886 – 1954) a French publisher, editor, and photographer. The small, but influential magazine aimed to establish fashion as an art alongside painting, sculpture and drawing. According to the magazine’s first editorial: “The clothing of a woman is a pleasure for the eye that cannot be judged inferior to the other arts.” Throughout its 13 years of existence the magazine strived to reflect the latest trends in fashion, lifestyle, and beauty.

The magazine, published on fine paper, signed exclusive contracts with seven of Paris’ top couture houses – Cheruit, Doeuillet, Doucet, Paquin, Poiret, Redfern, and Worth – to reproduce in luscious pochoir the designers’ latest creations. The centerpiece of the Gazette was its fashion illustrations , which were splendidly rich and elegant. Each issue featured ten full-page fashion plates (seven depicting couture designs and three inspired by couture but designed solely by the illustrators) printed with the color pochoir technique.

It employed many of the most famous Art Deco artists and illustrators of the day, including Etienne Drian, Georges Barbier, Erté (Romain de Tirtoff), Paul Iribe, Pierre Brissaud, André Edouard Marty, Thayaht (Ernesto Michahelles), Georges Lepape, Edouard Garcia Benito, Soeurs David (David Sisters), Pierre Mourgue, Robert Bonfils, Bernard Boutet de Monvel, Maurice Leroy, and Zyg Brunner. These artists, rather than simply drawing models in outfits, depicted them in various dramatic and narrative situations. The incidental detail in these illustrations are a goldmine for a writer, too, with furniture, transport and architecture providing a backdrop for some of the most attractive gowns and suits imaginable Each fashion print was hand-painted in vivid colors on handmade paper, making Gazette du Bon Ton one of the most desired period fashion magazines for collectors today.

Seascapes by Hiroshi Sugimoto

The Japanese photographer, Hiroshi Sugimoto, began this a series of photographs in 1980 in various locations throughout the world. A large format camera was used to make exposures of varying duration, hence the series is also sometimes known as “Time Exposed.” In each shot the horizon line bisects the image exactly in half. In 1991, Kyoto Shoin Co. of Tokyo, released Seascapes, a portfolio of 50 images and one installation image in an edition of 500 copies. The images are laser-scanned lithographic reproductions of photographs, each tipped along the upper edge to a thin mount, title and plate number blind stamped on the mount.
Note: Clicking on any seascape will activate the gallery, but from there, be sure to enter full-screen mode to fully appreciate these wonderful images.

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(Tokyo: Kyoto Shoin Co., 1991, an edition of 500 copies), a portfolio of 50 Seascapes and one installation image, laser-scanned lithographic reproductions of photographs, each tipped along the upper edge to a thin mount, title and plate number blind stamped on the mount, 1980-91, printed in 1991; together with the printed title, colophon, and exhibition and plate lists. Folio, hinged brushed aluminum box, one from an edition of 500
Each approximately 9½ by 12¼ in. (24.1 by 31.1 cm.)

 


French Fashion Watercolours 1920s pencil & ink; signed P. Aveline

 


Summerscape

A collection of whimsical photographs by Jacques Henri Lartigue …

In the 1910s and ’20s Lartigue enthusiastically photographed such subjects as automobile races, fashionable ladies at the seashore and the park, and kite flying. These photographs, with their informal approach to everyday subjects, reveal his free spirit and love of life, rather than a concern for photographic technique and craft, and often capture a sense of movement. He generally worked in black and white, Jacques Henri Lartigue was born into a well to do family and he started taking photographs at the age of  seven when he was given a camera. He photographed his friends and family at play – running and jumping; racing home-built race cars; making kites, gliders as well as airplanes.  In the 1910s and ’20s Lartigue enthusiastically photographed such subjects as automobile races, fashionable ladies at the seashore and the park, and kite flying. These photographs, with their informal approach to everyday subjects, show his “joie de vivre”  rather than a concern for photographic technique and craft, and often capture a sense of movement. He generally worked in black and white although there was a period latter in his life that he worked extensively in color.


 

Flair Magazine

Flair Magazine existed for only one year and twelve issues, from February 1950 to January 1951. In that time, it published the likes of Jean Cocteau, Tennessee Williams, Simone de Beauvoir, Gloria Swanson, John O’Hara, Eleanor Roosevelt, Bernard Baruch, Gypsy Rose Lee, the Duchess of Windsor, Lucien Freud, Salvador Dalí, Colette, and Saul Steinberg, among others.

Fleur Cowles conceived of the magazine, edited it, and, perhaps most impressive, persuaded her husband to publish it, even when it meant losing his shirt, if not his whole wardrobe. She lived until she was 101.
«From The Paris Review · read more»

 


 

Funny Ladies

Helen Hokinson and Mary Petty were cartoonists whose works graced the covers of The New Yorker Magazine. Over her 20 year career Hokinson contributed 68 New Yorker covers and more than 1800 cartoons. She is best remembered for her depiction of rather plump suburban women who were often “club” members. Mary Petty was the creator of the “Peabody” family who were feature on over 40 covers of the New Yorker.


 

La Belle Vie

The magazine, La Gazette du Bon Ton, was founded in 1912 by Lucien Vogel (1886 – 1954) a French publisher, editor, and photographer. The small, but influential magazine aimed to establish fashion as an art alongside painting, sculpture and drawing. According to the magazine’s first editorial: “The clothing of a woman is a pleasure for the eye that cannot be judged inferior to the other arts.” Throughout its 13 years of existence the magazine strived to reflect the latest trends in fashion, lifestyle, and beauty.


 

Urformen der Kunst


 

Illusion and Reality


 

A Portfolio by Inge Morath


 

Icons of French Photography


 

Arnold Newman

May 2010


 

Ida Wyman

August 2010


 

Esther Bubley

March 2010


 

Bernice Abbot

May 2010


 

New York — Yesterday
Photographs by Clemens Kalischer

November 2009